Safeguarding at IPS

IPS Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy 2022-2023

International Preparatory School Safeguarding Policy

Vision: Inspiring our learners to thrive in a world of change.

Mission: At IPS, we recognise the diverse learning needs of our pupils and inspire every child’s belief in themselves. We empower our learners to identify their own strengths and challenges. We create learning opportunities which support learners to lead their learning when appropriate. Our Learning Diversity and Inclusion (LDI) teachers play an important role to enhance every students’ ability to participate in our mission: Inspire, Empower, Lead.

An Introduction to Safeguarding at IPS

At IPS, our Board, teachers, students and parents work towards best practices to meet standards to safeguard and promote the welfare of IPS children as part of their common law duty of care for whom the school is responsible.

IPS adheres to all applicable statutes and laws with regard to Child Protection, Safeguarding and Well-being. In February 2022, The Children’s Act was enacted in Mauritian law. IPS follows the protocol set out by the International Task Force on Child Protection including its guidelines for “Managing Allegations of Child Abuse by Educators and other Adults” (2018)

We use the Programme Standards and Practices of 2020 set out by the International Baccalaureate organisation (IBO) to guide us as an IB school.

The standards are as follows:
● The school provides safe and effective learning spaces (0202-03-0300)

● The school demonstrates in its systems, processes and policies, attention to the social and emotional and physical wellbeing of its students and teachers (0202-03-0200)

● The school verifies that teachers meet the local and legal requirements for their roles to which they are appointed (0202-01-0200)
Being a CIS accredited school, IPS adheres to the requirements needed to provide a comprehensive, effective education for children, looking after their physical, social and emotional well-being. IPS follows the directives of CIS to educate its community so it may prevent and manage all types of abuse.

The IPS Safeguarding policy sets out to:

● take all reasonable measures to ensure that risks of harm to children’s welfare are minimised and;

● take all appropriate actions to address concerns about the welfare of any child, or children, working with agreed policies and outside agencies to support the welfare of the children.

IPS will strive to ensure that all its pupils remain safe and free from harm and is committed to playing a full and active part in any multi-agency response to child protection concerns.

Our Safeguarding team ensures that all staff and other stakeholders are aware of the procedures in place to safeguard and promote the welfare of its pupils. It will provide support training to all members of staff, volunteers, members of the Board and the community to create awareness about the safety or welfare of children at school and working online. All stakeholders at IPS will be aware of the school’s position in relation to all aspects of the child protection process.

Educators are in a privileged and trusted position. They have a unique opportunity to observe, listen, and interact with children over time. As such, they are also more likely able to identify those who are in need of help and protection. Faculty at IPS with any knowledge of abuse, (suspected or otherwise) or neglect have a professional responsibility to ensure that the child and the family avail themselves of the services needed to remedy any situation that constitutes child abuse or neglect.

Our commitment is to safeguard and promote the welfare, health (including mental health) and safety of our pupils by creating and maintaining an open, safe, caring and supportive atmosphere.

Our School Vision for Safeguarding at IPS

Part A: Aims and objectives of safeguarding in our school

Our commitment is to safeguard and promote the welfare, health (including mental health) and safety of our pupils by creating and maintaining an open, safe, caring and supportive atmosphere.

Understanding Safeguarding and Promoting the Welfare of Children According to the Department of Education (DfE), “Children (1) who need help and protection deserve high quality and effective support as soon as a need is identified”.

The common understanding of safeguarding is seen as:

● protecting children from maltreatment

● preventing impairment of children’s mental and physical health and development

● ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care

● taking actions to ensure that all children have the best outcomes

(July 2018 Working Together to Safeguard Children, A guide to inter-agency working to safeguard and promote the welfare of children page 6)

Safeguarding will be for all children up to the age of 18 years whether they are living with their families, foster carers or living independently. The safeguarding approach will be child-centred whereby any decisions made will be focused on the child’s well-being and to work in partnership with the children and their families.

IPS would endeavour for staff to practise the following for effective safeguarding strategies:

● vigilance: to have adults notice when things are troubling them;

● understanding and action: to understand what is happening; to be heard and understood; and to have that understanding acted upon;

● stability: to be able to develop an ongoing stable relationship of trust with those helping them;

● respect: to be treated with the expectation that they are competent rather than not;

● information and engagements: to be informed about and involved in procedures, decisions, concerns and plans;

● to be informed of the outcome of assessments and decisions and reasons when their views have not met with positive response;

● support: to be provided in their own right as well as a member of the family;

● advocacy: to be provided with advocacy to assist them in putting forward their views;

● Protection:to be protected against all forms of abuse and discrimination and the right to special protection and help if a refugee; DfE (2018)effective safeguarding from a child’s perspective would include: Page 10

Principle of Safeguarding at IPS

1. Prevent Harm

2. Safeguarding is Everyone’s Responsibility

3. Early Help and inter-agency work

4. For an early help assessment to be effective:

5. A Child’s Wishes

6. Reporting and handling a concern

7. Peer-on-Peer Abuse

8. Confidentiality

Part 2: Roles and Responsibilities

IPS adheres to all applicable statutes and laws with regard to Child Protection, Safeguarding and Well-being. In February 2022, The Children’s Act was enacted in Mauritian law. IPS follows the protocol set out by the International Task Force on Child Protection including its guidelines for “Managing Allegations of Child Abuse by Educators and other Adults” (2018)

We use the Programme Standards and Practices of 2020 set out by the International Baccalaureate organisation (IBO) to guide us as an IB school.

The standards are as follows:

● The school provides safe and effective learning spaces (0202-03-0300)

● The school demonstrates in its systems, processes and policies, attention to the social and emotional and physical wellbeing of its students and teachers (0202-03-0200)

● The school verifies that teachers meet the local and legal requirements for their roles to which they are appointed (0202-01-0200)

Being a CIS accredited school, IPS adheres to the requirements needed to provide a comprehensive, effective education for children, looking after their physical, social and emotional well-being. IPS follows the directives of CIS to educate its community so it may prevent and manage all types of abuse.

Board of Governors and Policies

The Board of Governors must ensure that they comply with their duties under legislation. They must have regard to this guidance, ensuring policies, procedures and training – are effective and comply with the law at all times (DfE 21.) The Board of Governors should cooperate with inter-agencies to provide the necessary support for children that will require child protection plans.

They will ensure that the school will give the necessary access to local authorities for social care and where appropriate allow the authorities to conduct investigations when appropriate.’The Board of Governors should have a senior lead member take leadership responsibility for their school’s safeguarding arrangements’ (DfE 80. Safeguarding) The Board of Governors need to support the school to ensure that safeguarding policy is embedded throughout school life.

The Governing bodies should ensure that there are appropriate policies in place in order for appropriate action to be taken in a timely manner to safeguard and promote children’s welfare (DfE 84.)

The Board of Governors will ensure that resources are provided in the budget for the Child Protection team to carry out the necessary training for all stakeholders.

Child Protection Officer

The governing body appoints the CPO or a member of the Senior Leadership team to take on the role of designated Safeguarding lead. This person has the appropriate training to support, give advice and support other staff members. They will take part in strategy discussions and inter-agency meetings. Supporting members of staff involved allegations or in managing students with a Safety Plan. The CPO should liaise with local authorities and work with other agencies. Should the designated CPO not be able to manage this role, the deputy CPO will be required to take on this role. The Deputy CPO must be trained to the same standard as the CPO. All concerns about a child (including signs of abuse and neglect) must be reported immediately to the Child Protection Officer (CPO) or in their absence to the Deputy Child Protection Officer (DCPO)